First 6 Weeks Stories

Week 1

My breastfeeding experience has been positive so far, for which I’m very grateful because my baby is tongue-tied and we were worried he would have a hard time latching. He’s doing well, though, and I’ve been grateful for the support I’ve had through Public Health and a local breastfeeding group. The biggest challenge for me was the reverse of what most people worry about. I had an excessive amount of milk and an overactive letdown. Since he was getting so much at once, my baby kept pulling off, choking and fussing. I’m glad that I knew this could be a symptom of overactive letdown because it allowed me to figure out better positions for nursing so he wouldn’t be overwhelmed by the flow.

Katherine, Cape Breton

Week 2

I am a young mother of three wonderful children. I have two sons, four years and three years, and a daughter who is seven months old. My two sons were breastfed until ten months and I continue to breastfeed my daughter. I have experienced it all, from the pain of my milk coming in, to wondering if my children would have enough to grow. Being up every two hours wondering if I was ever going to sleep again to babies having thrush and needing to pump often. I didn’t enjoy when the children were teething, not fun at all. It was really challenging at times as I had mastitis and had to wean my second son from breast to cup. What this boils down to is; as a mother I bonded with each of my children individually. I was able to sit and enjoy each and every feeding knowing that I was able to give them the best nourishment and didn’t have to worry about heating up bottles. It is naturally very convenient, and if you have a problem nursing in public, I have come across an item called “PEEK-A-BOO, which hides it all. It is all worth it, I have a tremendous bond with my children which is “PRICELESS”.

 

Week 3

I am currently breastfeeding my third child. My oldest daughter (13 years old) was breastfeed for 11 months; my son (11 years old) for two years. My youngest daughter is still going strong at 13 months. All three have had few colds while being nursed. In fact, the whole two years that my son was breastfed he did not have any ear infections. Less than a month after he was weaned, he got his first of many. At age five he ended up getting tubes in his ears. Fortunately, he hasn’t suffered from hearing loss which typically happens after chronic ear infections. I really feel that had I not breastfed for so long, he would have started with ear infections at an earlier age, and possibly have had more damage done to his ears.

Jennifer, Pictou County

 

I am currently breastfeeding my third child. My oldest daughter (13 years old) was breastfeed for 11 months; my son (11 years old) for two years. My youngest daughter is still going strong at 13 months. All three have had few colds while being nursed. In fact, the whole two years that my son was breastfed he did not have any ear infections. Less than a month after he was weaned, he got his first of many. At age five he ended up getting tubes in his ears. Fortunately, he hasn’t suffered from hearing loss which typically happens after chronic ear infections. I really feel that had I not breastfed for so long, he would have started with ear infections at an earlier age, and possibly have had more damage done to his ears.

Jennifer, Pictou County

 

My biggest fear of breastfeeding was not being able to leave my son to go to work or an appointment because I knew he was relying on me for food. So I decided to try pumping. I would pump in the morning when I was most full and developed a routine where I would feed him on one side and pump on the other. Each day I pumped milk that could be used for my husband or a babysitter to feed my son. Any extra was put in the freezer so that once I returned to work; I had lots of milk in storage. Pumping later in the day didn’t work for me since I never had enough milk, but early mornings were great.

Carla, Cape Breton

 

My first breastfeeding experience was a hard one. My son was not good at latching and was slow at feeding, so I spent much of my time sitting with him. I often felt frustrated and always tired so I was thankful for excellent health nurses and a supportive husband and mother because with their help, I nursed my son for seven months. With our newest son, he took to nursing right away, and two months later we are going strong. I think the most frustrating thing is not being able to go out without the baby, or worrying about getting home in time to feed him. I decided not to supplement him with formula, yet. Anything can change with a nursing mother. I am enjoying nursing this time around, it doesn’t seem to take as long, and my son is satisfied when feeding time is done. I like cuddling him and looking down at his quiet, content face. I really think the important thing is to take things day by day and just do your best. It is probably one of the hardest jobs I do because when I get tired or frustrated, there is no one else who can take over and help. But, whatever happens, if he nurses for a year, or switches over to formula, I know I tried and I gave my sons the best of myself for as long as I could.

Sarah

Almost 12 years ago I gave birth to a beautiful little girl. At that time, I made the choice to breastfeed, this is a decision that I am forever grateful that I made. The bond I had with her and each of my two boys is one that I will treasure for years to come. For each difficulty I faced, some harder to fix than others, I was always reassured by a call to the Public Health nurse, doctor, or a friend that all would be fine. My last child was tongue tied and had a difficult time latching. With patience and lots of support from a wonderful health nurse, we worked through it and succeeded in having him breastfeeding perfectly.

Donna

My breastfeeding challenges started the day my beautiful baby boy was born. He absolutely refused to latch; he would instantly fall asleep each time I put him to my breast. We stripped him, had full skin-to-skin contact, but he simply was not interested. The lactation consultants at the hospital were fantastic; we made a plan which included waking him every four hours, putting him to my breast, pumping and then feeding him from a little cup. The whole process took over two hours. There were many more challenges, but we eventually found our rhythm. Today, at three months old, I am proud to say that my son is breastfed! He is thriving, and I continue to enjoy all of the benefits of breastfeeding.

Lynette, Inverness County

I had no idea that breastfeeding my son was going to impact me as much as it has. The act of breastfeeding has become so much more than just a way to feed my son. The bond that we share is something I will always cherish, long after my son is weaned. Breastfeeding was something I had always hoped to do and I became very determined to make it work once I learned how critical it was to the health and well being of my baby. Getting through the first six weeks was at times challenging, but I soon discovered how natural a process breastfeeding actually was. We eventually got the knack of it and were then able to enjoy the freedom and ease that breastfeeding provides. I have been breastfeeding for nine months now and feel so proud that I have maintained this closeness with my baby while offering him the most superior food that I possibly can.

 

I have two children. My first child was very easy to breastfeed. He latched on perfectly from the very first time, he fed every two to three hours and I breastfed him until he was about eight months old. I thought breastfeeding was the easiest thing in the world and couldn’t understand why everyone didn’t do it, until my second child was born. He didn’t latch on well at all and it was very painful, and my nipples would bleed as they were very tender. I put up with the pain for about two weeks, but it was too painful so I had to stop breastfeeding. I felt really bad at first, but at least I tried.

Angela, Halifax County